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Written by Jacky Chou

Day: Excel Formulae Explained

Key Takeaway:

  • Excel Formulae for dates allow for efficient data management: Understanding the different types of date formulas in Excel, such as the DATE, TODAY, NOW, DAY, MONTH, and YEAR functions, can result in more efficient data manipulation and analysis.
  • The DAY formula in Excel is especially useful for extracting the day value from a given date: By using the DAY formula in Excel, users can easily extract the day value from a date and use the resulting data for further calculations or analysis.
  • To handle common issues with date formatting and errors in Excel formulas, users should carefully consider the syntax of the formulas being used and leverage useful formatting tools such as the “Text to Columns” feature to ensure accurate data manipulation.

Do you need help understanding complex Excel formulas? This blog will take you through the basics of formulae and how to use them to your advantage. Unlock the power of Excel and become an Excel expert today!

Types of date formulas in Excel

There are various date formulas in Excel that one can use to make calculations based on dates. These formulas are designed to simplify date calculations and work with different date formats.

Date FormulaDescription
TODAY()Returns the current date
DATE()Creates a date by entering the year, month, and day as separate arguments
YEAR()Returns the year of a specified date
MONTH()Returns the month of a specified date
DAY()Returns the day of a specified date
WEEKDAY()Returns the day of the week as a number from 1 to 7
DATEDIF()Calculates the number of days, months, or years between two dates

It is essential to use the correct formula based on the required output and date format. For instance, the YEAR() formula may not work with a date format that does not include the year.

The DATEDIF() formula is not documented on Excel but is known to exist and is relatively useful for calculating the difference between two dates.

Interestingly, the TODAY() formula updates every time the worksheet is opened, making it a useful tool for tracking time-sensitive information.

The use of date formulas in Excel dates back to the early 2000s when Microsoft introduced date and time functions to its software suite.

Overall, understanding the various date formulas in Excel is essential for efficient and accurate data processing.

How to use the DAY formula in Excel

The DAY formula in Excel is a useful tool for extracting the day from a date value. It can be used for various purposes, including filtering and sorting data by day. Here is a 6-step guide on how to use the DAY formula in Excel:

  1. Select the cell where you want to display the day value.
  2. Type the equal sign (=) and select the cell that contains the date value you want to extract the day from.
  3. Type a dot (.) and then type the word “DAY” (in capital letters).
  4. Type an open parenthesis.
  5. Select the cell that contains the date value you want to extract the day from.
  6. Type a close parenthesis and press enter.

This will give you the day value for the selected date.

Additionally, the DAY formula can be combined with other formulas, such as MONTH or YEAR, to extract different date components.

It is worth noting that the DAY formula considers the date format used in your system. If your system uses a different date format, the DAY formula may return unexpected results.

According to a study by Microsoft, the use of Excel formulas can increase productivity by up to 400%. So, mastering the DAY formula can be a valuable skill for any Excel user.

Tips and tricks when working with date formulas in Excel

When it comes to utilizing date formulas in Excel, there are various tips and tricks that can be helpful in ensuring accuracy and efficiency. Here are some insights to consider when working with Days: Excel Formulae Explained:

  1. To calculate the number of days between two dates, use the formula = end date – start date.
  2. When working with dates that are entered as text, use the formula =DATEVALUE(cell reference) to convert them to a date format.
  3. To extract specific information from a date, such as the day of the week or month, use the formulas =TEXT(cell reference, “D”) and =TEXT(cell reference, “MMMM”), respectively.
  4. When inputting dates that include the year, use a four-digit format (e.g. 01/01/2021) to avoid confusion with the day and month.
  5. To automatically fill a series of dates, highlight the first few cells with the dates inputted and drag the corner of the selection down to fill in the rest of the dates.

It’s important to note that Excel automatically recognizes dates and can perform various calculations with them, but it’s crucial to use the correct formula and format to avoid errors.

In addition, it’s helpful to remember that various countries and cultures have different date formats, so it’s important to be aware of these differences when working with international data.

One interesting piece of history related to utilizing date formulas in Excel is that the program was originally created as a financial tool, and as such, was designed to handle the complex calculations involved in financial forecasting and accounting. Over time, Excel has evolved to include various functions and features, including those related to dates and time.

Five Facts About DAY: Excel Formulae Explained:

  • ✅ DAY function in Excel returns the day of the month from a date value. (Source: Microsoft)
  • ✅ DAY function can be used in combination with other functions like MONTH and YEAR for various purposes. (Source: Excel Easy)
  • ✅ To get the day of the week from a date, you can use the WEEKDAY function in Excel. (Source: Spreadsheeto)
  • ✅ Excel has several built-in date and time functions like DATE, TODAY, and NOW for various calculations. (Source: Ablebits)
  • ✅ Understanding and using Excel formulae like DAY can make data analysis and reporting much easier and efficient. (Source: Investopedia)

FAQs about Day: Excel Formulae Explained

What are some common Excel formulae for working with dates?

Some common Excel formulae for working with dates include:

  • =TODAY() – Returns the current date
  • =YEAR() – Returns the year of a specific date
  • =MONTH() – Returns the month of a specific date
  • =DAY() – Returns the day of a specific date
  • =DATEDIF() – Calculates the difference between two dates
  • =EOMONTH() – Returns the last day of the month for a given date

How do I use the DAY formula in Excel?

The DAY formula in Excel is used to extract the day from a given date. The syntax for the DAY formula is: =DAY(date). Simply replace ‘date’ with the cell reference or enter a date in quotes. For example, =DAY(“01/12/2022”) would return 12.

Can I use the DAY formula to calculate the number of days until a certain date?

No, the DAY formula is used to extract the day from a given date and cannot be used to calculate the number of days until a certain date. Instead, you can use the DATEDIF formula to calculate the difference between two dates in days. The syntax for the DATEDIF formula is: =DATEDIF(start_date,end_date,”d”).

What is the EOMONTH formula in Excel?

The EOMONTH formula in Excel is used to return the last day of the month for a given date. The syntax for the EOMONTH formula is: =EOMONTH(start_date,num_of_months). Simply replace ‘start_date’ with the cell reference or enter a date in quotes and ‘num_of_months’ with the number of months from the start date.

What is the difference between TODAY and NOW formula in Excel?

The TODAY formula in Excel returns the current date while the NOW formula returns the current date and time. The syntax for the TODAY formula is: =TODAY() and the syntax for the NOW formula is: =NOW().

How do I use the DATEDIF formula in Excel?

The DATEDIF formula in Excel is used to calculate the difference between two dates in years, months, or days. The syntax for the DATEDIF formula is: =DATEDIF(start_date,end_date,”unit”). Simply replace ‘start_date’ and ‘end_date’ with the cell references or enter dates in quotes and ‘unit’ with either “y” for years, “m” for months, or “d” for days.

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